Viva Seething

Seethingography was originally a way for me to come down to Seething and start a writing group, and to engage Seething Villagers in thinking about what made the place that they live in special to them. I ran workshops, meet ups and an event for National Poetry Day, plus we went on a drift through Seething to explore its many quirks and secrets.

The blog has seen lots of writing and images exploring this theme, and led to the publishing of two anthologies of writing in The Seethingographer, the first from Seething Writers and the second from writers all over the world (as Seething has no boundaries!) writing on the theme of ‘Going Home’.

The Seethingographer #2

Anyone who is familiar with my own writing, and practice as a walking artist, may know that much of my work is concerned with place- how we are affected by it and how we affect it. This led to my publishing a chap book, Villiers Path, about a narrow footpath in Surbiton, which has a surprising history attached to it. I hope to do some walks and performances there later this year. See my blog or Facebook page for updates on this in the Autumn.

Villiers Path: Scalloped Time Chapbook

I was also lucky enough to publish local ecologist and bat expert Alison Fure’s pamphlet, Kingston’s Apple Story By A Michelson’s Seedling, about the local history and apple growing heritage in the Royal Borough of Kingston Upon Thames and surrounding area. I am delighted to say this is now in its second print run, and I have been chuffed to be able to support Alison’s drive to try to save the Tolworth Apple Store in publishing this important work.

Kingston’s Apple Story by Alison Fure

Chapbooks are for sale here at £2 + £1.20 p&p

The chapbooks were published by Sampson Low Ltd, a wonderful and historic publisher, and I am very grateful to Alban Low for his support.

Thanks as ever to The Marvellous Smellymaroo for her skill and kindness with design and layout of all the chapbooks.

I was very lucky to be able to use the Museum of Futures to hold events and workshops for Seething Writers, and am grateful to Robin Hutchinson and the Community Brain for allowing me to do so. Thank you!

This is my final post for now for Seethingography. I am handing it over to the lovely Seething folk, Simon Tyrrell and Sharon Zeqiri, who took over the running of Seething Writers earlier this year.

Seething is believing….So long and thanks for all the sardines!

Lucy Furlong

http://www.lucyfurlong.com/

Lucy Furlong is a widely published writer, performer and walking artist. Her poetry map, Amniotic City, was featured in The Guardian and her pamphlet , clew, was published by Hesterglock Press in 2015. Her poetry map, Over the Fields, was published in September 2015, and her latest chapbook, Villiers Path, was published by Sampson Low this year.

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The Teapot

Once when I was young and naïve I destroyed a green teapot with a black lid by putting it down the rubbish chute of the flats I lived in. It was a blameless item, existing its little heart out from home to home, its final place that flat in a boxy brick estate lit by round streetlights, the bushes below the window precipitating hordes of small green flies up through the windows  on summer nights when the blue sign of the Cunard Hotel glared sullenly across the void at us. The windows faced westwards; so no sunrise to greet our morning egg and toast and marmite, if there ever was such a thing. But sunsets, over the bend in the river a mile away, roaring in silent sheets of flame.

I once wondered how large a sunset actually is. Is it the size of a memory? Does it have a real extent? The Northern Lights show up on film when invisible to the eye.

Although there were no stars in our night sky, there were robins singing their hearts out as we walked from the Tube station, across the sullen dark of the main road, up the street of Victorian houses and into the flats like a rabbit turning tail and darting down its burrow to safety from the drifting hawk, the prowling fox.

Home. Where I felt safe. Home.

http://chramies.typepad.com/

Chris Amies was born in south London and lived for many years in Hammersmith, which still appears in much of his fiction. He is the author of one published novel (“Dead Ground”, published by Big Engine and reissued by Clarion), one non-sfiction book (Hammersmith and Fulham Pubs, published by Tempus) and about 25 short stories, and has reviewed fiction for the BSFA and Tangent Online. He recently diversified into anthology editing (“NeaDNAthal” available from Fringeworks) and full-length translations from French.

Nobody Knows

There’s a place you go

Where nobody knows

Where the rain doesn’t fall

And the wind doesn’t blow

Where the sun doesn’t shine

And the earth doesn’t grow

Where the Shepherd doesn’t lead

And the Mower doesn’t mow

There’s a place you go

Where nobody knows

Where secrets stay hidden

And you don’t have to show

There’s a place you go

Where nobody knows

There’s that place you go

And Nobody knows

Marcia Knight-Latter

Home (today)

Home is a metal robin and a vase

Andy Harrod

I write not out of a desire to tell stories, but a need to understand what it is to be alive. Though the use of writing, art and photography I explore themes of love, loneliness, despair, hope and the individual. I believe creativity is at its most beautiful when it challenges; wanting my writing and art to make people pause, reflect and feel. I am interested in if and when do we awake to our life, to a sense this is it and to living in the moment. I am curious to why for so many of those moments we are not authentic, instead we live hidden behind masks and afraid to be who we are; ruled by external messages, expectations and demands on us, rather than guided by our sense of self and the present. My writing is fuelled by the hope that by engaging authentically with ourselves and others we stop fearing difference and embrace our own individualism and enjoy this collective individualism. The rest is up to each of us.

View my writing and books at http://decodingstatic.co.uk.

Contact me at andy@decodingstatic.co.uk or on twitter @DecodingStatic.

 

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