David Russamano Launches his first Poetry Collection!

Come along and enjoy poems and drinks in the cellar venue of the historic Flying Horse pub – apparently, the last on Oxford Street, on Saturday May 20th! David Russamano, who has graced Seething Writers meet ups on a number of occasions, launches his first chapbook, (Reasons for) Moving, and we would love you to come and join us to celebrate!

(Reasons for) Moving is published by Structo publishers (read what they say about it here), the wonderful team who publish the Structo literary magazine, which, if you haven’t read it, is really a beautifully produced journal of writing worth seeking out.

What people have said about (Reasons for) Moving:

This is an impressive and enjoyable collection of poems. Russomano deserves readers.

— Wendy Cope

Russomano is an intriguing new poet I expect big things from, based on the poems here, which seem intelligently poised between American and British poetic stances. At once exotic, historical, melancholy, and well-made, these elegant, thoughtful poems of place and change have unexpected outcomes – slipping off into new, submerged possibilities, like the house on the frozen lake, that is not, well, really all that solid. An impressive debut.

— Todd Swift

Russomano combines a serious wanderlust and wonderful evocations of place, with a careful consideration of the value of home. Perfect ingredients for the pull and push of poetry, these poems beautifully dovetail diction with structure. A true delight to the eye and the heart.

— Lucy Furlong

David Russomano’s (Reasons for) Moving records a widely travelled life. ‘Writing Home from Quepos’, ‘After the Revolution: Kathmandu, 2006’, ‘Ankara’, and other vividly compelling poems about distant places interweave with poems located closer to home, such as ‘What Begins and Ends with Water’, the delightful and mordant ‘Saint John’s’, or the chilling ‘Cutting Corners’, about a mall built on the toxic site of a former brake pad factory. Beautifully evoked, this varied and memorable collection only gets better and better with each rereading.

— Ann Fisher-Wirth

Congratulations to Dave! To celebrate he is launching his chapbook  in Central London, at a FREE event in the cosy environs of the cellar bar of The Flying Horse, on the corner of Oxford Street and Tottenham Court Road. More info here.

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Dear Seething Writers: Future’s So Bright….

Dear All,

I bear glad tidings and sad tidings:

Sad tidings: I am no longer able to give Seething Writers the time and energy that I would like to and have, since its inception in June 2016. This is simply due to other commitments, and there not being a time machine readily available to squeeze everything in…

Glad tidings: I am delighted to say that Sharon Zeqiri and Simon Tyrrell will take over as organisers and facilitators, so that Seething Writers can continue! I am so pleased to hand over to two great people, talented writers in their own right, who have been active members of Seething Writers from the start.

Thank you all for being there and for enthusiastically taking part and trying out all the writing activities; for walking and talking and sharing your work and words- it has been an absolute pleasure- and I hope I will be able to pop in and say hello and come for a pint at some point, and maybe persuade you into another walk sometime!

Lucy X

Next dates for Seething Writers meet ups at the Museum of Futures:

March 20th

April 24th

May 22nd

Something wonderful is about to happen…

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Seething Writers Workshop February 28th 2017

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“Seething Writers Go Totally Ekphrastic”

Tuesday 28th February 7.30pm – 9.00 pm at The Museum of Futures, Surbiton. Facebook event HERE.

Please come and join in if you write or would like to write, and would like to meet other like-minded folk! We will talk writing, do writing and then go to the pub.
We will be writing in response to the visual poetry show at the Museum

More info about this forthcoming exhibition and events can be found here:

http://www.theenemiesproject.com/#/futures/

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The Seethingographer, Issue 1, Winter 2016

The Seethingographer Chapbook
The Seethingographer Chapbook

The Seethingographer is a ‘compact and bijou’ anthology of some of the writing and images from the Seethingography blog, written by Seething Writers, or about Seething in some way (which of course, has no boundaries…). With contributions from Sharon Zeqiri, Sinead Keegan, Lisa Davison, Simon Tyrrell, The Historier, Paul Miner, Robin Rutherford and Katharine Scott.

This is an A6, full colour chapbook, published by Sampson Low Ltd, under the brand new Seethingography imprint, where more work by Seething Writers, or about Seething will be published in the future.

The chapbook was launched on Thursday December 1st, as part of the fantastic Collect Connect retrospective exhibition currently on at Kensington and Chelsea College.

There will also be a Seethingographer launch at the Seething Writers Make Merry event, which is FREE, and takes place on Monday 5th December at the Museum of Futures in Surbiton, from 7.30pm – 9.30pm. Mulled wine will be served and we will be celebrating a successful six months of Seething Writers meet ups. Everyone is invited to bring a piece of writing or poems to share, with a festive theme if you would like!

More information and facebook event here.

Copies of The Seethingographer will be on sale at the launch for £2 each, or you can buy them via Sampson Low – look under Seething Chapbooks here

Huge thanks to Alban Low of Sampson Low for publishing The Seethingographer, and to all the Seethingers who have come and taken part in Seething Writers meet ups, walks and events, to everyone who has submitted work to this blog.

Special thanks also to Robin Hutchinson and Simon Tyrrell for suggesting I get involved…x

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Seething Sparkles

Seething Sparkles
*Seething Sparkles*

I turned up to the Seething Events planning meeting to send my apologies and offer face embellishing at the community days. The immediate response was “oh can I have some glitter now!”

“OK is it someones birthday because I need an excuse? Ah Andy Cummin’s is going to Edinburgh for a month! OK then if I put my hand into my bag and find glitter I’ll do it.”

Of course it was the first thing my fingers touched so off I went walking around applying glitter dots to the beautiful faces…

Simone Kay has been painting faces since working on a play bus in the early 80’s and face painting at the first  Kingston Green Fair.  At Glastonbury festival she started to cut and use her own stencils to help speed up face painting 160 people in two hours with her team. She has always enjoyed using sparkly glitter as it seems to lift the spirits of participants and observers.

(*note from the Editor- I’ve been saving this post for a rainy day)

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Seething Town, the place I want to be

That Seething Feline (photo by Lucy Furlong)
That Seething Feline (pic by Lucy Furlong)

Back to the future. It all started in the Museum of the Future. It had been a detective agency once, reminded him of one of the Douglas Adams novels, Dirk Gently Holistic Detective Agency or something like that. The whole area was known as the Wells, somewhere he had passed by many times but he had heard many interesting stories about it and now here he was. He looked up and even the clouds looked a bit different. Definitely something different about the place though he couldn’t quite pinpoint what it was.

He started walking along the street, noticed a few road cones and a small yard with some hollyhock plants in it, then started walking along the main road near the river. A couple of cyclists went past, it reminded him that there was a big cycle race the following weekend, happened every year and always lots of people watching, some having picnics on the local village green or watching it pass by outside the local pub.

On past the local wine store and the Old waterworks building which was now a gym and student accommodation. He remembered the time the waterworks was still in use and even the slight smell from the old filter beds  and looking around began to imagine what it might have been like back in the day. Now it was a wildlife haven, a few years ago someone had the idea of building floating houses there but  fortunately that had been abandoned. So many stories he had heard about the area, about giants and caves and a mysterious goat-boy, wondering how many of them were true, maybe that was where the detective agency came in ..

He was brought back from his reverie by his friend passing by with his large but amiable husky type dog, he lived just round the corner and they chatted for a while, walking past the car showroom and the golf studio . After the man left he walked on towards the gated estate, no dogs allowed in the park there so just as well his friend had left by then he thought. He then noticed a cat was following him, as he approached the private garden, looked like a lovely place with large garden, shared walkway and small pond and fountain in the distance. He played with the cat for a few moments before it wandered back to where it had come from. Remarkable to think that the garden had once been a small reservoir, even Alan Titchmarsh hadn’t managed that big a makeover.

Soon be was passing the park where they held a community sports day every year, and then through the Wells estate on the way back to the Museum. There was definitely something different about this place,whether it was the distinctive appearance, the wild garden with the bee hives, and the back gardens of the houses near the Museum. Maybe it was here that the strange tale he had heard about the little goat boy who lived in a cave underneath the mountain originated, it all began to make a bit of sense.

Finally it was back past the old emporium shop with contented cat inside and back to the Museum

As he met up with his friends in the Young Sheep pub afterwards, he reflected, yes there was magic in Seething Town …

By Mark Badcock

 

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Picnics and Paintings…24 hours in Seething

It started, as it so often seems to in Seething, with the Guinea pigs… shopping for picnic ingredients in Sainsbury’s. And then a hop, skip and jump to St Andrew’s Square, frilly with bunting and with Lefi in attendance. Rum punch galore and fine music played by a man in the baggiest trousers I have witnessed outside of Glastonbury. Could one want for any more on a scorchio August Bank Holiday in the suburbs?

But there was more- after the picnic came the art- a marathon of it- at the Lamb, with the promise of a cape to be fashioned, looooooong pictures for colouring in, competitions to enter, metal to be twisted into new and exciting shapes, large pieces of fabulous art on the gates outside the pub, and on the wall in the garden.

Not forgetting of course, the small matter of a Fairy staying up through the night to magic up a wonderful watercolour…

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And- even more- the next day,beginning this morning, Sim running a stained glass workshop in the garden!

 

All for charity, with the finished pieces to be auctioned later this year and you can still donate here for Creative Youth – because all of this was done to raise funds for this superb charity.

I still wonder if all these amazing things can really be taking place in the sleepy town where I grew up…but they really are.

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By Lucy Furlong

www.lucyfurlong.com

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Art for a Day…Today!

Kay Galbraith- The Art Fairy
Kay Galbraith- The Art Fairy

Art For A Day will be a multi-disciplinary art event over 24 hours raising money for Creative Youth.
Beginning at 3pm on the 29th August during the community picnic in St Andrew’s Square, Surbiton, Art For A Day will see multiple artists creating work and running workshops over the 24 hours and will be spread out between the Lamb Pub and the Museum of Futures.

Two artists Kay Galbraith and Eddie Langham will be creating a piece of art over the 24 hours. Kay will be painting and Eddie will be making a fashion piece. Members of the community will be invited to bring their inspiration and take part in both pieces.

From the Lamb website:

The wonderful Kay Galbraith will be creating a painting over 24hours, she told us a little bit about her and the project:

“I started painting in January 2012 and shortly after I found myself illustrating a book written by Robin Hutchinson called The Little Rainbow Coloured Bird which supports Creative Youth.
From then on I always supported Creative Youth and the wonderful festival that fills Kington with energy and life for a few
weeks in July.
I had been mulling over what fund raising event I could possibly do to support them when I came up with the idea of painting a watercolour over 24 hours! Another reason being is I feel I don’t paint enough and this will make me paint!!!
The painting will then be auctioned later in the year with all monies going to Creative Youth Charity.”

Throughout the event many other artists will be producing work which will culminate in an exhibition and auction in a few months. There will also be many workshops and opportunities to get involved and create something of your own which could be included in the exhibition.

The money raised through this event will go to Creative Youth, organisers of the international Youth Arts Festival. Creative Youth enables young people to realise their potential through the arts, develops young people by equipping them with the skills and confidence to succeed in business and the arts, and celebrates the achievements of young people in the arts worldwide during the International Youth Arts Festival. It is a special charity helping the headliners of tomorrow get noticed and helping those young people who need skills, direction and support to get noticed too! Have a look at www.creativeyouthcharity.org

Our community always gives very generously and we’d like to say a big thank you! To give you an idea of the difference your donation can make to, here’s an idea of what it can go towards:

£900 covers the new and much needed music equipment
£320 covers the cost of road closures for an event
£100 covers the cost of hiring a van for a day
£12.20 pays for travel for a musician, another £12 covers a meal and drink as well
£25 buys art supplies
£3 buys a box of pens

If you would like to make a donation please follow the link bellow to the team Just Giving page.
https://www.justgiving.com/teams/artforaday

 

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Seething Writers of the Walking Kind

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So, Seething Writers of the Third Kind, as it was billed on Facebook, became Seething Writers of the Walking Kind… our first foray into what I have been calling Seethingography, and this was it- a walk around Seething Wells for just over an hour. We met at the Museum of Futures and the walk began with a small reading from Phil Smith’s wonderful book ‘On Walking’, followed by the famous Walt Whitman lines:

now voyager

It was great fun, and we were very lucky to be accompanied by Seething experts Simon Tyrrell and Howard Benge who have studied the history of the filter beds and Seething Wells water works, amongst other local history. It will be interesting to see what writing comes out of this psychogeographical exploration of the area.

view from the lambeth waterworks steps
view from the lambeth waterworks steps

The next Seething Writers meeting takes place on Monday August 22nd, from 7.30- 9pm at the Museum of Futures in Surbiton. There is a Facebook Group here or email seethingography@gmail.com to be added to the mailing list.

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Traditional Threshold offering

In Regency times when life could be a bit ooh la la in Seething, it became the tradition to leave an offering of pommes frites at the threshold of one’s abode, after an evening of revelry. Before the introduction of this French delicacy (by Le Duc Gordes Benet, who often travelled through Seething on his way to do business de fromage serieux in Cheesington) villagers left a potato, or stretching further back into the mists of time, a turnip. This was a way of offering Seething ancestors a spiritual morsel, and assuaging any guilt for waking the dead with the unholy racket they were making at that time of the evening…Shhh….vestiges of this traditional practice still take place today, mostly after 11pm on a Friday or Saturday night.

discovered by Lucy Furlong

http://www.lucyfurlong.com