Viva Seething

Seethingography was originally a way for me to come down to Seething and start a writing group, and to engage Seething Villagers in thinking about what made the place that they live in special to them. I ran workshops, meet ups and an event for National Poetry Day, plus we went on a drift through Seething to explore its many quirks and secrets.

The blog has seen lots of writing and images exploring this theme, and led to the publishing of two anthologies of writing in The Seethingographer, the first from Seething Writers and the second from writers all over the world (as Seething has no boundaries!) writing on the theme of ‘Going Home’.

The Seethingographer #2

Anyone who is familiar with my own writing, and practice as a walking artist, may know that much of my work is concerned with place- how we are affected by it and how we affect it. This led to my publishing a chap book, Villiers Path, about a narrow footpath in Surbiton, which has a surprising history attached to it. I hope to do some walks and performances there later this year. See my blog or Facebook page for updates on this in the Autumn.

Villiers Path: Scalloped Time Chapbook

I was also lucky enough to publish local ecologist and bat expert Alison Fure’s pamphlet, Kingston’s Apple Story By A Michelson’s Seedling, about the local history and apple growing heritage in the Royal Borough of Kingston Upon Thames and surrounding area. I am delighted to say this is now in its second print run, and I have been chuffed to be able to support Alison’s drive to try to save the Tolworth Apple Store in publishing this important work.

Kingston’s Apple Story by Alison Fure

Chapbooks are for sale here at £2 + £1.20 p&p

The chapbooks were published by Sampson Low Ltd, a wonderful and historic publisher, and I am very grateful to Alban Low for his support.

Thanks as ever to The Marvellous Smellymaroo for her skill and kindness with design and layout of all the chapbooks.

I was very lucky to be able to use the Museum of Futures to hold events and workshops for Seething Writers, and am grateful to Robin Hutchinson and the Community Brain for allowing me to do so. Thank you!

This is my final post for now for Seethingography. I am handing it over to the lovely Seething folk, Simon Tyrrell and Sharon Zeqiri, who took over the running of Seething Writers earlier this year.

Seething is believing….So long and thanks for all the sardines!

Lucy Furlong

http://www.lucyfurlong.com/

Lucy Furlong is a widely published writer, performer and walking artist. Her poetry map, Amniotic City, was featured in The Guardian and her pamphlet , clew, was published by Hesterglock Press in 2015. Her poetry map, Over the Fields, was published in September 2015, and her latest chapbook, Villiers Path, was published by Sampson Low this year.

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Kingston’s Apple Story, By A Michelson’s Seedling

*Launching today!*

Alison Fure’s Kingston’s Apple Story, By A Michelson’s Seedling,is the third chapbook to be published on the Seethingography imprint of Sampson Low Ltd. This colourful A6 pamphlet tells the story of Kingston’s orchards and apple growing heritage across 16 pages, squeezing in juicy chunks of local history, and the importance of orchards as places sustaining an amazing amount of wild life and rich biodiversity. You will also find out about some of the fascinating people in the Borough who remember, for example, what life was like as a child in Hook when it was full of orchards!

 

“Behind the bakery was an orchard from which I was chased many a time by the irate owner, named by us as ‘old man Phipps…We rarely did any scrumping in the orchard, just used it for Cowboys and Indians and tree climbing.” (J. Mutimer, Hook resident, 1920s)

 

It features the Tolworth Apple Store- a beautiful, but desperately in need of restoring, old barn c.1856, not far from Tolworth Court Moated Manor. Alison hopes that this important piece of local heritage can be saved and restored for everyone to enjoy.

Please help her and sign the petition here!

Copies of the chapbook are available to buy from Sampson Low, and from Alison herself, whose website and contact details are here.

The chapbook is £2.00 plus p+p

Alison is a field ecologist specialising in bats. She is a director at Kingston Environment Centre and a license trainer for the London Bat Group. She believes that orchards can help soften the impact of urbanisation; if each child could plant an apple tree-in their name-it would halt the spread of ‘green desert’.

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A higher temple?

theHistorierMay23rd2016

Strange shapes and forms appear within the architectural façades of Seething. Have you seen them? Geometric shapes, pyramids, towers and columns are integrated into buildings in and around the Victoria Road. Taken all together these separate parts form a 3D jigsaw puzzle.

It was all created by a chap who delved into the hermetic and pagan during the Long Seething Century. AKW Shorom, was a Seethinger through and through, born into a humble family, but blossomed at the Great Library under the guidance of Pross. It was there he learnt of the classical times, when Seethingers would share knowledge and ideas with other peace loving communities from across the world. It was through a system of energy harnessed through limestone, where the lime crystals vibrated emanating sound, replicating the voice at the other end of the energy- “line”. As time went by people started fashioning heads out of the stone, and eventually the likenesses of people. They were called statues, from the greeting on picking up a message, “’s t’at you?”

This was before the days of the Great Schism, when all contact broke down and was never again established. Unbeknownst to each other, a patchwork of communities carried across the world. Was all lost? Shorom thought not. He designed a temple to embrace the ancient energies circulating the world. A giant antenna. It would act as radio sending out messages to other secret societies. His great temple would make contact with those societies and the worldly secrets passed on and shared.

Shorom was hounded out of Seething by jealous Aldermen of the great council. But what of his temple? He was a cunning man. He broke it up and gave it to an architectural scrap yard to sell, on one condition. No part may leave the boundaries of Seething. At a time of few architectural fragments, the parts were scooped by builders and quantity surveyors, who built them into their own designs.

No one knows what happened to Shorom. It is said he sometimes returns to Seething in disguise as an hospitaller or a cheesemonger, and that one day he will return as the great architect to rebuild his temple and return peace to the world.

As you walk round Seething, keep an eye out, look at the buildings. If you see something, place your hand upon it and feel it vibrate.

By the Historier

The Historier blogs at https://anhistoriersmiscellany.wordpress.com/