Oh little town of Seething Wells

robinrutherfordwalk

Oh, little town of Seething Wells, how still we see thee lie – Meandering through our own waterworks, we risked being run down, by joggers or commuters we crossed at lights.

Tourists from another world, gazing in awe at blue painted railings, snapping brickwork and each other.  Visitors gathering samples to take back to our craft.

Like schoolboys we searched our pockets for things to drop into a well, took photos of the sun, quenched by filterbeds.
Brave voyagers, we walked amongst the resting places of a thousand souls.  Where were these creatures for whom water had been cleaned and towers built?

We called, yet no one answered, tuned instead to cobbled together tales of northern streets on glowing screens hung on walls where once their ancestors gazed benignly down.  Good grace stayed our hands that longed to knock and wake them up.

Leave them to their slumbers, like Titania’s host, we must away, to pick through the gathered fruits, choosing which to eat and which to store away.

By Robin Rutherford

http://www.robinrutherford.co.uk/

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Seething Writers of the Walking Kind

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So, Seething Writers of the Third Kind, as it was billed on Facebook, became Seething Writers of the Walking Kind… our first foray into what I have been calling Seethingography, and this was it- a walk around Seething Wells for just over an hour. We met at the Museum of Futures and the walk began with a small reading from Phil Smith’s wonderful book ‘On Walking’, followed by the famous Walt Whitman lines:

now voyager

It was great fun, and we were very lucky to be accompanied by Seething experts Simon Tyrrell and Howard Benge who have studied the history of the filter beds and Seething Wells water works, amongst other local history. It will be interesting to see what writing comes out of this psychogeographical exploration of the area.

view from the lambeth waterworks steps
view from the lambeth waterworks steps

The next Seething Writers meeting takes place on Monday August 22nd, from 7.30- 9pm at the Museum of Futures in Surbiton. There is a Facebook Group here or email seethingography@gmail.com to be added to the mailing list.

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A higher temple?

theHistorierMay23rd2016

Strange shapes and forms appear within the architectural façades of Seething. Have you seen them? Geometric shapes, pyramids, towers and columns are integrated into buildings in and around the Victoria Road. Taken all together these separate parts form a 3D jigsaw puzzle.

It was all created by a chap who delved into the hermetic and pagan during the Long Seething Century. AKW Shorom, was a Seethinger through and through, born into a humble family, but blossomed at the Great Library under the guidance of Pross. It was there he learnt of the classical times, when Seethingers would share knowledge and ideas with other peace loving communities from across the world. It was through a system of energy harnessed through limestone, where the lime crystals vibrated emanating sound, replicating the voice at the other end of the energy- “line”. As time went by people started fashioning heads out of the stone, and eventually the likenesses of people. They were called statues, from the greeting on picking up a message, “’s t’at you?”

This was before the days of the Great Schism, when all contact broke down and was never again established. Unbeknownst to each other, a patchwork of communities carried across the world. Was all lost? Shorom thought not. He designed a temple to embrace the ancient energies circulating the world. A giant antenna. It would act as radio sending out messages to other secret societies. His great temple would make contact with those societies and the worldly secrets passed on and shared.

Shorom was hounded out of Seething by jealous Aldermen of the great council. But what of his temple? He was a cunning man. He broke it up and gave it to an architectural scrap yard to sell, on one condition. No part may leave the boundaries of Seething. At a time of few architectural fragments, the parts were scooped by builders and quantity surveyors, who built them into their own designs.

No one knows what happened to Shorom. It is said he sometimes returns to Seething in disguise as an hospitaller or a cheesemonger, and that one day he will return as the great architect to rebuild his temple and return peace to the world.

As you walk round Seething, keep an eye out, look at the buildings. If you see something, place your hand upon it and feel it vibrate.

By the Historier

The Historier blogs at https://anhistoriersmiscellany.wordpress.com/

 

Column Planting Line

lamp post seedling
lamp post seedling

Lamp post seedlings are delivered to Seething on an irregular basis, to shed light on whatever needs shedding light on and isn’t getting that light shedded* on it. They are sturdy young specimens, metal beanpoles which must be carefully transported from secret lamppost-growing tunnels, deep in the Thames Valley. Under protective black canvas, they grow in the dark like rhubarb, unless it is a moonless night, when they are acclimatised to fresh air and turn their lights to face the sky for the first time. As you can see they are very carefully planted, using the Seething Regulation Column Planting Line to ensure successful transplanting in the material that will support their growth best.

*technical term

Lucy Furlong

www.lucyfurlong.com