Two Running Poems

Runners roots
Runners roots
Ter Race number 12642

Runners

       hell.

You, that’s who!

Sweaty locks and discomfort.

Trust in a few jelly babies for every

emotional and physical

        response

Found poem from 9 things you need for race day survival


Runner’s roots

Found: one trainer along the Portsmouth Road,

rooted to its spot atop a wall.

Lace tendrils carefully pruned, suggest a

recent transplantation.




Less is more,

except when running,

then two feet are always better than

                one.

        Run on.

Circuit complete, the trainer remains.

Pale circular roots have sprouted.

It means to settle. And why not, since this

                                         wall

                                         is as nice

                                         as any,

with its south-facing aspect and communal garden.

It’s the sort of place that nourishes

the soul;

the sort of place that one might

                 blossom.

By Lisa Davison
Lisa is running the Royal Parks Half Marathon
to raise money for Children and the Arts Start Hospices programme.
http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/fundraiser-web/fundraiser/showFundraiserPage.action?userUrl=LisaAndrews6&faId=728966&isTeam=false

 

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One Blue Shoe

SW_4thJuly2016_4I was suddenly transported, wondering where the thought had come from, why it had just now come into my mind.

The Lost Gloves of Seething are all at once sad and amusing but there was nothing amusing here, no wreaks and nobody drowning, in fact nothing to laugh at at all. There it goes again, my mind inappropriately lightening the mood.

But this was real, all too real. I shook my head to clear the thought and leapt back to reality. I tore my gaze away from that tiny child’s shoe with its slow trickle of blood, stark red against the blue plastic.

And through the smoke and the rubble, the noise and charred crumpled bodies I ran to be of whatever little help I might be.

By Roger Hayes

(originally from Seething Writers writing prompt: Ready, Steady Write)

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